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DNA & Genetics Genealogy Books

bookTrace Your Roots with DNA : Using Genetic Tests to Explore Your Family Tree Written by two of the country's top genealogists, this authoritative book is the first to explain how new and groundbreaking genetic testing can help you research your ancestry

According to American Demographics, 113 million Americans have begun to trace their roots, making genealogy the second most popular hobby in the country (after gardening). Enthusiasts clamor for new information from dozens of subscription-based websites, email newsletters, and magazines devoted to the subject. For these eager roots-seekers looking to take their searches to the next level, DNA testing is the answer.

After a brief introduction to genealogy and genetics fundamentals, the authors explain the types of available testing, what kind of information the tests can provide, how to interpret the results, and how the tests work (it doesn't involve digging up your dead relatives). It's in expensive, easy to do, and the results are accurate: It's as simple as swabbing the inside of your cheek and popping a sample in the mail.

Family lore has it that a branch of our family emigrated to Argentina and now I've found some people there with our name. Can testing tell us whether we're from the same family?

My mother was adopted and doesn't know her ethnicity. Are there any tests available to help her learn about her heritage? I just discovered someone else with my highly unusual surname. How can we find out if we have a common ancestor? These are just a few of the types of genealogical scenarios readers can pursue. The authors reveal exactly what is possible-and what is not possible-with genetic testing. They include case studies of both famous historical mysteries and examples of ordinary folks whose exploration of genetic genealogy has enabled them to trace their roots.

bookHow to Interpret Your DNA Test Results for Family History & Ancestry: Scientists Speak Out on Genealogy Joining Genetics
by Anne Hart

Scientists in the news speak out from opposite sides of the fence on the question of DNA testing for researching family history and ancestry. How do you interpret your own DNA test results? How do you work with or research oral history?

What’s the cultural component behind a trait as biological as your genes? If you’re a beginning family historian, an oral history researcher, or a person with no science background fascinated with ancestry, here’s how to understand and use the results of DNA tests. Scientists, media, historians, and business owners share different opinions on whether DNA testing is a useful tool in the hands of family historians.

Steve Olson, author of the book, Mapping Human History in a telephone interview with me answered my question, "What do you say about using DNA as a tool for genealogy—to extend family history research?"

Does Steve Olson think DNA testing as a tool is useful to genealogists? What does Bryan Sykes, author of the best-selling, The Seven Daughters of Eve have to say? Sykes’s book has a very different opinion about DNA testing and genealogy/family history research. The two have opposite views. Numerous scientists comment.

Sykes is associated with Oxford Ancestors, the world's first company to harness the power and precision of modern DNA-based genetics for use in genealogy. The motto on the Oxford Ancestors Web site reads: “Putting the genes in genealogy.” Use these resources and easy to understand explanations for family history research.

bookHow to DNA Test Our Family Relationships (Paperback)
by Alexander Kuklin, Terrence Carmichael

- Paul Allen, Co-founder of MyFamily.com and Ancestry.com
“The information about your ancestry is hidden in your DNA. This book invites you to reveal it. A must read for those interested in uncovering their true family identity and history.”

Book Description
How to DNA test your family relationships is a condensed and informative guide to molecular biology techniques used in studying biological relations with close and distant family members. You may have heard of mitochondrial Eve and nuclear adam. Now read about how to test DNA and answer questions of your true historic identity, ethnicity, religion, and even geographical origin.

- Paperback: 160 pages
- Publisher: Dna Press (December 28, 2000)
- ISBN: 0966402715
- Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.5 x 8.5 inches

bookDNA And Family History (Paperback) by Chris Pomery, Steve Jones

In the wake of highly-publicized scientific breakthroughs in using genetics to establish family connections, genealogists began to see potential for their own research. Now many are finding that organizing tests is a relatively straightforward matter - and that comparing the DNA signatures of individuals can reveal startling information on families, surnames and origins.

About the Author
Chris Pomery is organizer of the pioneering Pomeroy study, which has been widely cited in coverage including Radio 4's Surnames, Genes and Genealogy and Steve Jones' controversial book Y: The Descent of Men. He lives in Cornwall, England.

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