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LookupFamily History Books - Chris Paton

The books associated with this author are listed below.

Tracing Your Family History on the Internet

The internet is revolutionizing family history research. Every day new records and resources are placed online and new methods of sharing research and communicating across cyberspace become available. Never before has it been so easy to research family history and to gain a better understanding of who we are and where we came from. But, as Chris Paton demonstrates in this straightforward practical guide, while the internet is an enormous asset, it is also something to be wary of. Researchers need to take a cautious approach to the internet information they acquire. They need to ask, where did the original material come from and has it been accurately reproduced, why was it put online, what has been left out and what is still to come? As he leads the researcher through the multitude of resources that are now accessible online, Chris Paton helps to answer these questions. He shows what the internet can and cannot do, and he warns against the various traps researchers can fall into along the way.
Discover Scottish Church Records

In this detailed guide, family historian Chris Paton explores the history and records of the various churches in Scotland prior to 1855, the year in which civil registration commenced within the country. He describes the theological changes imposed by the Reformation of 1560, the nature of the state's battles with the Kirk, and the Kirk's subsequent battles within itself. Most importantly, he also discusses the nature of the records generated by the various Scottish churches, how to interpret them, and above all else, how to find them. Whether you are looking for tales of ministers carried into the air by Scotland's fairy folk, the fire and thunder of John Knox, a detailed explanation of the online offerings of the Scotlands People website, or the treasures waiting in the National Records of Scotland, this is the definitive research guide to help anyone with Caledonian connections.
Discover Scottish Land Records

This latest guide from family historian Chris Paton takes a look at the complicated records concerning land and property based research in Scotland. For centuries property transactions within the county were governed by feudal tenure, a system which was abandoned in England and Wales in the Middle Ages, but which continued in Scotland until 2004. But feudalism was not the only method by which land was held, with udalism, duthcas, leasehold and more competing as forms of tenure across the country at different times. Connected with the rules surrounding property transactions were those associated with the inheritance of land and heritable estate, all of which is explained in great detail. From sassines to skat, from retours to precepts of clare constant, and from apparent heirs to heirs apparent, this concise guide will help you get to grips with one of the most exciting and useful topics within Scottish family history.
The Mount Stewart Murder: A Re-Examination of the UK's Oldest Unsolved Murder Case

In March 1866, Janet Rogers travelled to the Perthshire-based farm of her brother, William Henderson, to help with chores while he looked for a new domestic servant. Three days later she was found dead in the farm kitchen, killed by multiple blows from an axe. Ploughman James Crichton was suspected of the atrocity, and after a lengthy investigation was arrested and tried in Perth, with the case duly found non-proven. Was Crichton the guilty party? If not, why did William Henderson try to frame him? Why was the previous servant on the farm sacked, and why did she wait eight months to accuse Crichton of being responsible? And what led to Henderson being driven insane, ultimately to end his days in a Perthshire lunatic asylum? The murder investigation remains the UK's oldest unsolved murder case. Just who was the killer at Mount Stewart Farm?
Researching Scottish Family History

Researching Scottish Family History is a detailed introductory guide to those wishing to explore their Caledonian roots. Published by the Family History Partnership, which aims to provide genealogical books at an affordable price, the book is a packed 120 page guide to all areas of Scottish research, with information both on traditional and internet based resources. The book starts with a basic chapter in getting started, detailing how to get the best out of talking to your relatives, ways and means to record your research and more. The second chapter continues with a guide to the institutional lay of the land, the records repositories that will help with your efforts, including the most detailed guide to the new Scotlands People Centre yet committed to print, as well as various other institutions in both Scotland and England that may help with your research. The next five chapters provide detailed coverage of the basic statutory, parish, census and probate documents used within Scottish research, as well as an in depth look at the role of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Scottish research. The remainder of the book deals with the unique records connected to Scottish land holdings, occupational research records (including for Scots in the armed forces), the relevance and methods of DNA research, heraldry and tartans, and other useful sources.
Tracing Your Irish History on the Internet

Ireland has experienced considerably more tragedy when it comes to the preservation of resources for family historians than its close neighbour Britain. Many of the nation's primary records were lost during the civil war in 1922 and through other equally tragic means. But in this new book Chris Paton, the Northern-Irish-born author of the best-selling Tracing Your Family History on the Internet, shows that not only has a great deal of information survived, it is also increasingly being made available online. Thanks to the pioneering efforts of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, the National Archives of Ireland, organizations such as FindmyPast Ireland, and RootsIreland, and the massive volunteer genealogical community, more and more of Ireland's historical resources are accessible from afar. As well as exploring the various categories of records that the family historian can turn to, Chris Paton illustrates their use with fascinating case studies. He fully explores the online records available from both the north and the south from the earliest times to the present day. Many overseas collections are also included, and he looks at social networking in an Irish context where many exciting projects are currently underway. His book is an essential introduction and source of reference for anyone who is keen to trace their Irish roots.


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